WEBCASTERS BRIEF CAPITOL HILL; COPYRIGHT OFFICE TO HOLD ROUNDTABLE ON NOTICE AND RECORD KEEPING OF SOUND RECORDINGS

WASHINGTON - As the May 21 deadline approaches for the Register of Copyrights to rule on the CARP proposed royalty rates, over two dozen Internet radio companies will make the rounds on Capitol Hill to speak with Members of Congress about their plight.

"These companies, small to large webcasters, have come here to Washington - on their own dollar - to let the Members of Congress know that the CARP's proposed rate will effectively shut many of them down," said Kurt Hanson, publisher of "RAIN: Radio And Internet Newsletter"(http://www.kurthanson.com) and one of the organizers of the "SaveInternetRadio.org" initiative that included last week's "Day of Silence" (http://www.saveinternetradio.org).

Over twenty webcasters will brief Members of Congress on Thursday, May 9, and then attend Friday's all-day roundtable at the United States Copyright Office that will debate the best structure for webcasting record keeping of sound recordings during a broadcast.

The press will have an opportunity to meet with the webcasters prior to their activities here in Washington, DETAILS BELOW:
May 9, 2002 (THU)

11:00-11:30 a.m. Press Briefing/Conference Call
PRESS BRIEFING Re: Webcasters on Capitol Hill
Location: Rayburn House Office Building, B352

**THERE WILL BE NO CALL-IN # FOR THIS PRESS CONFERENCE. WEST COAST REPORTERS SHOULD TRY TO GET THEIR DC BUREAU COLLEAGUES TO COVER THIS EVENT.

6:00-9:30 p.m. Webcaster Reception, Tortilla Coast, Capitol Hill

Press Welcomed

May 10, 2002 (FRI):
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Copyright Office Roundtable
"Notice and Record keeping for Use of Sound Recordings Under Statutory License"
Location: Mumford Room, LM649, 6th fl., James Madison Memorial Building

**Requests to participate or attend roundtable must be made by e-mail to 114roundtable@loc.gov or by fax to (202) 252-3423

"We are at the crux of a pivotal time in this industry. Internet radio webcasters are banding together with their allies in the digital media industry, large and small, to fight for fair royalty rates that will ensure diversity and minority ownership in this new form of 'broadcasting.' If Internet radio is allowed to survive, it will obviously be a 'win' for consumers, but it will also be a 'win' for artists and creators, keeping alive new venues for their work," added Hanson.

Media Contact:
Alan Wallace
(425) 691-8757
awall.webcasters@presscontact.com